World Beach Project

I love the way the Internet makes art projects that span the globe possible. And I love art that is transient. So I’m very drawn to the World Beach Project, devised by Sue Lawty in assocation with the V&A Museum, where she is Artist in Residence. Over the years our family has left patterns and sculptures with shells, sand, stones, seaweed, and all the random richness left by the tides, on beaches all over England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales. The World Beach Project imposes a discipline – only stones may be used. Within that… explore the possibilities. I feel an excursion to the shore coming on.

Madeleine L’Engle

I was saddened to learn of the death on Thursday of writer Madeleine L’Engle, aged 88. She’s probably best known for her children’s fantasies, which I first read as an adult and found enthralling, but she also wrote prolifically about art, creativity and Christianity. ‘Walking on Water: Reflections on Faith and Art’ is very dear to me, but this quote is from ‘A Circle of Quiet’, which strangely enough, I bought just last Monday.

It’s all been said better before. If I thought I had to say it better than anybody else, I’d never start. Better or worse is immaterial. The thing is that it has to be said; by me; ontologically. We each have to say it, to say it our own way. Not of our own will, but as it comes out through us. Good or bad, great or little: that isn’t what human creation is about. It is that we have to try; to put it down in pigment, or words, or musical notations, or we die.

Leif Enger in the foreword to ‘Penguins and Golden Calves’ called Madeleine L’Engle

… chiefly an apologist for joy – one of the rare ones who consistently upholds her own definition of art: that which speaks of what was true, is true, and what will be true.

And I would add – along with joy – love, playfulness, and mercy. A great writer and a wise woman. Her spirit touched mine and I will miss her.